Van Gogh Museum Journal 2002


auteur: [tijdschrift] Van Gogh Museum Journal


bron: Van Gogh Museum Journal 2002. Van Gogh Museum, Amsterdam 2002


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[p. 104]



illustratie

fig. 1
Glashaven, where the Oldenzeel gallery was situated, Rotterdam, Gemeentearchief


[p. 105]

In search of Van Gogh's Nuenen studio: the Oldenzeel exhibitions of 1903
Martha Op de Coul+

In 1903 three exhibitions of work by Vincent van Gogh from his Dutch years were organised by the Oldenzeel gallery in Rotterdam. In January, May and November of that year the public were able to view a collection of paintings and drawings that had never before been on public display. These exhibitions caused quite a stir when it emerged that even the Van Gogh family had not been aware of the existence of this group of works. Where had the collection come from? Why had no one in the family circle known anything about it? The exhibitions prompted the Van Gogh family to launch an inquiry to establish the rightful owner of the pieces. The investigation concluded that the works must have come from the studio that Van Gogh had left behind in Nuenen.

More than 20 years later Benno Stokvis published his Nasporingen omtrent Vincent van Gogh in Brabant,1 in which he endeavoured to clarify the history of Van Gogh's Nuenen studio. His sources included interviews with persons who had been directly involved. Two questions, however, remain yet unanswered: first, which works had been displayed at the Oldenzeel exhibitions; and, second, could these works actually be traced back to the Nuenen studio?

J.-B. de la Faille (1886-1959) was the first Van Gogh specialist to consider these exhibitions in detail. Illustrations in the journal Moderne Kunstwerken from 1903 allowed him to identify several works that had been in the January show in his oeuvre catalogues of 1928 and 1939.2 New information gathered from further study was subsequently incorporated into his posthumously published catalogue, The works of Vincent van Gogh: his paintings and drawings (1970). Still, to date no systematic research has been conducted regarding the works displayed at the exhibitions.

Using the sources currently available, the present article will endeavour to reconstruct the Oldenzeel exhibitions and to establish the connection, if any, with Van Gogh's Nuenen studio. Although this reconstruction is plainly incomplete in some respects, the interim results of the study seem sufficiently important to warrant publication.

Oldenzeel: art dealers in Rotterdam3

In 1855 Christiaan Sander Johan Vlaanderen Oldenzeel (1833-1896)4 entered into partnership with the Rotterdam bookseller Hendrik van Gogh (1814-1877), one of Vincent's uncles and owner of a shop on Steiger. Three years later Hendrik transferred full ownership of the business to Oldenzeel. In 1874 the latter decided to switch from the book to the art trade. His business was based on Zuidblaak, first at number 16, later at number 84. In late 1888 Oldenzeel moved to handsome premises at 74 Leuvehaven.5 Here, in the spring and autumn of 1892, he held two shows of Van Gogh's work, chosen from the collection administered by Jo van Gogh-Bonger (1862-1925) on behalf of her minor son Vincent Willem (1890-1978). These exhibitions made Oldenzeel the first dealer in Rotterdam to introduce art lovers to works from Van Gogh's Dutch and French periods.

The firm remained at this address for more than ten years, until 1899, when Margareta Wilhelmina Oldenzeel-Schot (1837-1912), who had assumed control of the busi-

[p. 106]

ness on the death of her husband in December 1896, was forced to move out. She found new premises on the Glashaven, which were refitted by the Rotterdam architect J.C. Meijers (fig. 1).6 In late February 1899 the gallery opened with an exhibition of paintings, drawings and graphic work by contemporary, mainly Dutch, artists. The press was enthusiastic about the new space. The Rotterdamsch Nieuwsblad wrote on 27 February: ‘Today Mrs Oldenzeel opened a new art gallery at the establishment redesigned for her at no. 20 Glashaven [...]. In her new establishment Mrs Oldenzeel disposes of two, not excessively large galleries with good, even light. The rear gallery is lit from above.’ According to the reviewer in the Arnhemsche Courant of 4 March, the work was displayed to good effect against sober green wallpaper. Albert Plasschaert (1874-1941), who also visited the exhibition, noticed the floor of the galleries, which was of pine painted a bluish, light green.7 Although Mrs Oldenzeel regularly introduced visitors to the work of young artists (Charles Gruppe, Willy Sluyter, Ferdinand Hart Nibbrig), she also routinely displayed pictures by painters of the Hague School. In 1903 the gallery had a conspicuously full programme, comprising no less than nine separate shows, including the three of Van Gogh's works.

In 1904 Oldenzeel held another Van Gogh show, from 10 November to 15 December. Once again, previously unknown pieces from the artist's Dutch period were on display, alongside unsold work from the 1903 shows. Among the pictures not for sale were some ten paintings from Van Gogh's French period, loaned by private collectors. De la Faille was the first to identify the works at this exhibition. The results of his research were published in his 1970 catalogue of Van Gogh's oeuvre. For this reason the present article does not include a discussion of the 1904 show.8

Between 1892 and 1906 the gallery held eight exhibitions entirely dedicated to the work of Van Gogh. In May 1907 Mrs Oldenzeel sold the business and moved to Apeldoorn. Her successor, J.B. Harmeyer, did not organise any further Van Gogh shows.

No archives of the Oldenzeel firm appear to have survived. In order to reconstruct the 1903 exhibitions, therefore, I was compelled to rely on reviews published in national and regional newspapers and journals of the period, which regularly supplied relevant information. The works themselves could also provide evidence of an ‘Oldenzeel’ connection, as pieces handled by the firm often have the following characteristics: the canvas or paper has been attached to panel or card (Oldenzeel took this measure in order to conserve works that had suffered the effects of long-term storage);9 a thin red strip of paper is affixed to the edges of the works;10 and there is an Oldenzeel label on the back (fig. 2).11

The studio in Nuenen

The history of Van Gogh's ‘abandoned studio’ is no longer entirely unknown. In 1904/05 Jo Cohen Gosschalk-Bonger12 instructed lawyers to conduct an investigation into the affair. 1926 saw the publication of the Stokvis book, containing recollections by the relevant individuals. However, information concerning ownership and biographical data still remained incomplete or lacking. I have endeavoured to fill these hiatuses in order to obtain a clearer picture of what actually happened to the studio and its contents.

In late November 1885 Van Gogh decided to move to Antwerp. Here he hoped he would be able to work in peace, free of the sorts of pressures he had experienced in Nuenen, where pastor Andreas Pauwels13 had made it virtually impossible for him to find models. Although his intention

[p. 107]



illustratie

fig. 2
Oldenzeel label (8.5 × 6.2 cm) on the back of F 14 JH 1193


was to spend several months in Antwerp and then to return to Nuenen, things turned out differently: in February 1886 the artist moved to Paris instead of returning to Brabant.

Before leaving for Antwerp Van Gogh had lived and worked in the house of sexton Johannes Leonardus Schafrat (1847-1924) and his wife Adriana Schafrat-van Eerd (1853-1930).14 As Adriana Schafrat informed Stokvis, Van Gogh had intended to stay away for just a few weeks, which explained why he left everything behind, including his stock of work and household effects.15

In March 1886 Vincent's mother, Anna Cornelia Carbentus (1819-1907), and his sister Willemina (Wil) Jacoba (1862-1941) moved to Breda. The work from Van Gogh's studio was packed into crates and deposited with a Breda carpenter called Schrauwen. This must have been Adrianus Schrauwen (1834-1920), who lived at 87 Ginnekenstraat.16 When Anna Cornelia and Wil then moved to Leiden in November 1889, the crates were left behind and soon forgotten.17 In late June 1888 Van Gogh had actually written to his sister from Arles, asking her if she could salvage something of his ‘rommel’ (‘junk’), which, ‘according to Theo, was still somewhere in an attic in Breda’ [633/W4]. It is not known if Wil responded to this request, for Van Gogh does not mention the matter again in his subsequent letters.

When, after years in obscurity, Oldenzeel began to exhibit the unknown collection of work in 1903, Jo took immediate action. She asserted that the pieces belonged to her son Vincent, as he was the sole heir of her deceased first husband, Theo van Gogh. She questioned Vincent's mother about the matter, but the old lady could no longer remember the events precisely.18 The first person who could shed any light on the matter was Cornelia (‘Kee’) Adriana Vos-Stricker (1846-1918), one of Vincent and Theo's cousins. In early June 1903 she wrote to Jo that her mother, Willemina Catharina Gerardina Stricker-Carbentus (1816-1904), Van Gogh's mother's sister, remembered the crates having been deposited with a carpenter.19

Although Schrauwen was then eventually traced, Jo regarded the information he provided as suspect. It was at this point that she instructed J.M. Jolles, a lawyer with practices in Amsterdam and Bussum, to investigate the matter further. Jolles in turn requested the assistance of a Breda-based colleague, F.E. Pels Rycken.20

Correspondence between the lawyers reveals that Schrauwen had made questionable statements regarding the number and nature of the items that had been deposit-

[p. 108]

ed with him. He spoke of a ‘mess of ironwork, paper, etc., including possibly several drawings,’ which he had sold in 1902 to a man he called Goeverneur (= Couvreur).21 However, it proved impossible to obtain a clear picture of these transactions, as Schrauwen's memory often failed him. Pels Rycken and Schrauwen eventually agreed that the latter would pay the Van Gogh family what he had received for the sale of the works. Schrauwen claimed this entailed only eight paintings, sold for a total of 128 guilders, as he had allowed Johannis Cornelis Couvreur to remove the items in the attic for nothing. However, when the moment arrived to pay up, Schrauwen's son, Adrianus Wilhelmus (1871-1943),22 declared that at least for the time being he was in no position to honour his commitment.23 In early June 1905 Jolles informed Johan Cohen Gosschalk that Schrauwen Jr would receive regular reminders to pay the agreed sum. Reading between the lines, however, it is evident that he was far from confident that the latter would meet his obligations.24

When the lawyer made inquiries of the following owner, J.C. Couvreur, he was informed that - according to Couvreur's own records - the furniture dealer had purchased more than 40 works, including watercolours, for one guilder apiece, on 14 August 1902.25 Years later, however, Couvreur told Stokvis a very different story: he claimed that, together with his brother, Johannes Marinus, he had acquired 60 stretched paintings, 150 loose canvases, 80 pen drawings and 100 to 200 crayon drawings.26 These works then came into the possession of a certain Kees Mouwen (1853-1913/14),27 who ran a gala clothing and military uniform shop at 22 Lange Brugstraat in Breda (fig. 3).

Mouwen wished to dispose of his collection of Van Goghs. Since there were no sales opportunities in Breda, he turned to Oldenzeel in Rotterdam. The art critic Hendrikus

illustratie

fig. 3
Advertisement for C. Mouwen & Zoon in the directory of 1900 (p. 214), Breda, Stadsarchief


Petrus Bremmer (1871-1956) was probably responsible for making the contact, as can be inferred from a note by Bremmer's wife: ‘In 1903 a resident of Breda came to B. to ask his advice as to how he could sell off a large collection of paintings by Van Gogh, which he had bought for a trifle when, many years ago, these had been peddled around that city, and which he had then put in his attic. B. advised him to exhibit them for sale at the Oldenzeel gallery in Rotterdam. That exhibition gave B. a further opportunity to point out Van Gogh's art to his pupils.’28 It thus came about that Oldenzeel was the first art dealer to display these previously unknown works.

In 1904 Mouwen put a portion of the unsold work up for auction at Frederik Muller in Amsterdam. The sale, which took place on 3 May, proved a great disappointment for him: of the 41 works included only 11 were sold; the total net profit was a mere 450 guilders.29 The lawyer Jolles

[p. 109]

commented on the sale: ‘He had to withdraw everything, apart from 11 pieces. Net proceeds 450 guilders. Everything belonged to Kees Mouwen, Willem gets percentages!’30

This text reveals that Mouwen was not acting on his own; in fact, he was working hand in glove with the career soldier Willem van Bakel (1866-?),31 who had settled in Breda in 1902 after serving in the Dutch East Indies from 1896-1901. Van Bakel had been given a post at the Koninklijke Militaire Academie (Royal Military Academy) for the training of cadets; on 2 March 1904 he received an honourable discharge at his own request. A month later he left again for the Dutch East Indies, after which point he disappeared from sight. He may have returned to the Netherlands on leave in 1919.32

In all probability, Van Bakel and Mouwen knew each other through their families. From the age of two, Willem van Bakel had resided in the house of his uncle Petrus Wilhelmus Egers (1822-1896), a Utrecht broker, and his aunt Engelina van der Putten (1822-1879), a sister of his mother, Johanna van der Putten (1834-1909). Following Engelina's death in 1879, Egers remarried a year later. His new wife was Louise de Penasse (1840-1911), an aunt of Kees Mouwen's wife, Johanna Ots (1877-1905).

It is difficult to determine precisely in what way Van Bakel and Mouwen collaborated. Jolles's letter of 6 June 1905, quoted above, mentions ‘percentages’ of the auction proceeds going to Van Bakel, which appears to suggest a role as an intermediary. However, other sources explicitly describe Van Bakel as owner, at least of some works.33 Van Bakel himself acted as such in a letter to a certain H.D. Pierson of Scheveningen, dated 13 January 1904, in which he talked of ‘my Van Gogh collection.’34 If we assume that Van Bakel was indeed an owner - in my opinion the most likely supposition - the question remains of whether there was a single collection owned by two individuals or two collections with different provenances.

The latter possibility is also suggested in a letter written by Louisa Daeter-Egers (1884-1971), daughter of Van Bakel's uncle Petrus Wilhelmus Egers and his second wife Louise de Penasse. In 1953, i.e. 50 years after the event, she set down the following story concerning the provenance of the Van Bakel works.35 She claimed that her father had owned a crate containing at least 80 Van Gogh works; in the days following his death (Oirschot, 1 May 1896), she alleged, his foster son took possession of the crate, which he then had taken to Breda. Here Daeter's story ends. In 1905 Jolles had heard a similar tale from Louise Egers-De Penasse, although he never managed to clarify the true facts of the case. Remarkably, he makes no mention of an unlawful appropriation of works by Van Bakel.36 Assuming there is a foundation of truth to the story, some of the works exhibited for sale at the Oldenzeel gallery may not have come from Schrauwen and Couvreur, and thus not have originated in Van Gogh's abandoned studio.

Daeter's story implies that some 80 works by Van Gogh had come into Eger's hands before 1 May 1896, the date of his death. The existence of such a substantial collection of unknown Dutch works, alongside the contents of the Nuenen studio and the pieces owned by the Van Gogh family, is extremely problematic. Doubts are reinforced by the total lack of evidence as to how these pictures came into the possession of the Utrecht broker in the first place. Given the current state of research, the existence of a separate collection of works deriving from the Egers family does not seem very likely.37

[p. 110]

The Oldenzeel exhibition of January-February 1903

On Saturday, 3 January 1903 (fig. 4) an exhibition of hitherto unknown work by Vincent van Gogh was opened in the rear gallery of Oldenzeel's premises (Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant, 3 January). Many of the pieces were apparently the property of Willem van Bakel.38 According to the reviewer D.B. (= Julius de Boer), writing in the Kroniek of 17 January, around 40 works were on display. On 20 January the Rotterdamsch Nieuwsblad reported that the exhibition comprised 45 pieces. Although lack of an exhibition list or catalogue makes it impossible to determine the precise number of works in the show, there must have been around 50 in total.

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. every day for more than a month, visitors could view paintings and drawings from Van Gogh's Dutch period, ranging from still lifes and interiors with weavers to portrait heads and landscapes. In the Kroniek of 7 February the critic Albert Plasschaert noted that there were many ‘surprises,’ meaning that no one should think they already knew Van Gogh's work. Plasschaert saw a correspondence between Van Gogh and Millet, for both artists were greatly interested in depicting the working man or woman, and the toiling labourer. But there were also differences: Millet's work emanated a ‘classic calm’ while Van Gogh's manifested ‘drama’ and ‘turbulence.’

R. Jacobsen's review in the journal Onze Kunst discussed various works at length. Jacobsen also considered Van Gogh's technique, which, he wrote, varied ‘from admirable skill to childlike ineptitude.’ He illustrated his opinions by comparing ‘Stilleven van kool en klompen’ (Still life with cabbage and clogs, F 1 JH 81) and ‘Visscherskarikaturen’ (Caricatures of fishermen, F 5 JH 188 and F 6 JH 189). At the end of his review, however, Jacobsen tempered his criticism somewhat, declaring that although a work might seem clumsy, this was a deliberate choice on Van Gogh's part, with the artist endeavouring to render the characteristic aspect of an action, which sometimes produced a caricature-style effect.39

Around 20 January, when the exhibition had been open for more than two weeks, the collection was re-hung, resulting in an adjustment to the numbering in some instances (Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant, 25 January).40



illustratie

fig. 4
Announcement of the Van Gogh exhibition at the Oldenzeel gallery, Het Vaderland, 11/12 January 1903, The Hague, Koninklijke Bibliotheek


In several discussions of the exhibition reviewers mentioned the prices Oldenzeel was asking for the works. ‘The grapes are sour for gentlemen art buffs! Now they have gradually started to realise that purchasing a work by Vincent van Gogh would not be such a poor investment, the owners are asking prices, prices!’ (Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant, 11 January). Although no sums were actually given, an indication of the prices can be found in a recent publication on the Gerlach Ribbius Peletier collection.41 In 1903 and 1904 Ribbius Peletier bought seven paintings at the Oldenzeel gallery from Van Gogh's Hague and Nuenen periods. The prices the collector noted in his account book range from 500 guilders for the head of a peasant woman to 700 for landscapes. A decided anomaly was ‘Zeetje’ (Seascape at Scheveningen, F 4 JH 187), for which he paid 2,500 guilders.42

When the exhibition closed on 5 February, 17 works had been sold.43

[p. 111]

Reconstruction of the exhibition held from 3 January to 5 February 1903 See pp 113-14.

The exhibition held in May 1903

In May 1903 Oldenzeel organised another, smaller, presentation of Van Gogh works in the front gallery of her premises.44 Alongside the nine paintings and a single drawing she also exhibited works by other artists, such as Paul Gabriel, Willem Roelofs, Theo van Hoytema and Willem Tholen.

R.J. Jacobsen devoted several columns in Onze Kunst to the exhibition, whose works were drawn, for the second time that year, from Oldenzeel's ‘secret storeroom.’45 Jacobsen was particularly struck by the landscapes, which he described as ‘specimens of sensitive lyrical landscape art.’ The reviewer in the Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant of 31 May was also full of praise for the works on display.

Although no list of the works presented has been preserved, these reviews have made it possible to identify most of the works.

 

Reconstruction of the exhibition held in May 1903 See p. 114

The exhibition held in November- December 1903

In late 1903 Oldenzeel held the third, and largest, exhibition of work from Van Gogh's Dutch period. From 1 November visitors could view around a 100 pieces; the drawings were displayed in the front gallery, while the rear was reserved for the paintings. Having been prolonged, the exhibition finally closed on 13 December.46

The exhibition received a great deal of attention in the national press. Articles in the Wereldkroniek by N.H. Wolf on 7, 14 and 21 November played a major role in promoting the show.47 Wolf even claimed that the exhibition might be the event of the year, declaring that the time had come for Van Gogh's art to sell, and also for interest to be shown from abroad. The critic's predictions proved correct, as pictures were sold from the very outset. He described the new owner of a still life with ‘blue porcelain pot’ (probably F 52 JH 535) as a ‘happy’ man. In his final review, Wolf was able to report that the exhibition was continuing successfully; many art lovers having seized the opportunity to view Van Gogh's work in Rotterdam. The Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant reviewer also offered his opinion of the show in three articles (8, 15 and 22 November), declaring that the visitor could now see the rest of the ‘mysterious’ Breda collection, for which the two galleries were actually too small.

It would be interesting to know how Oldenzeel arranged the works in the two rooms. Were they hung according to theme, period or size? Unfortunately, we do not know. The only person to touch upon this subject was the critic for the Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant (22 November), who mentions three paintings of considerable size: ‘Watermill’ (no. 48, F 125 JH 525), ‘Potato planters’ (no. 52, F 41 JH 513) and ‘Shepherd’ (no. 45, F 42 JH 517), all hung together. He felt the ‘Shepherd’ was painted very woodenly in comparison with the other two works.

The paintings were displayed in black frames (Rotterdamsch Nieuwsblad, 16 November). One painting still fitted with its exhibition frame is Avenue of poplars in Nuenen (F 45 JH 959), which was purchased in 1903 for the permanent collection of the Museum Boymans in Rotterdam. It is remarkable, but in fact this simple frame shows the work to its best advantage, allowing viewers to focus all their attention on the painting itself.

Wolf's enthusiasm for Van Gogh's work was shared by Albert Plasschaert, although the latter was also irritated that interest in the artist only now seemed to be developing

[p. 112]



illustratie



illustratie



illustratie

figs. 5a, b and c
List of works exhibited at the Oldenzeel gallery in November 1903, Amsterdam, Van Gogh Museum


(Kroniek, 7 November). He felt this was merely an ‘affected’ enthusiasm, stirred up by ‘a teacher’ who was leading the ‘herds,’ as people did not truly appreciate Van Gogh's art.48 Plasschaert employed terms such as ‘grand’ and ‘extraordinarily real’ to characterise the collection, claiming that few artists could evoke such feelings through their art.49

Alongside discussions in newspapers and periodicals, an extremely important document, published here for the first time, provided a source for reconstructing the exhibition: Oldenzeel's own record of the works on display, which gives their title and supplies them with a number. The Van Gogh Museum acquired this ‘catalogue’ from the estate of Albert Plasschaert (figs. 5a, b and c).50 The list records 64 paintings and 36 drawings and watercolours. It also bears annotations by Plasschaert, who made notes to several catalogue numbers and a sketch near one entry during a visit to the exhibition. These aides memoire have proved extremely valuable, making it possible in more than one instance to identify works with a reasonable degree of certainty.

 

Reconstruction of the exhibition held from 1 November to 13 December 1903 See pp. 114-18.

[p. 113]

Reconstruction of the exhibition held from 3 January to 5 February 1903*

No. 1
Faille 1928/1970
- / -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 2, 37
Faille 1928/1970 - / 48a
Op de Coul 48a
Sources51 AH 5 January; NRC 11 January; OK, I, p. 115
Comments In AH as no. 37
No. 3, 38
Faille 1928/1970 39 / 39
Op de Coul 39
Sources AH 5 January; NRC 11 January; Kr 17 January, p. 20 and 7 February, p. 46; RN 20 January, OK, I, p. 115; MK, no. 4, item 26 (with reproduction)
Comments In AH as no. 38
No. 4
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 144
Sources NRC 25 January
Comments See Van Tilborgh and Vellekoop, op. cit. (note 41), p. 36
No. 5
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources NRC 25 January
Comments Painting entitled Head: ‘weight of dark colours’
No. 6
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources NRC 25 January
Comments Painting entitled Head: ‘weight of dark colours’
No. 7
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 8
Faille 1928/1970 - / 58
Op de Coul 58
Sources OK, I, p. 116
Comments -
No. 9
Faille 1928/1970 197 / 197
Op de Coul 197
Sources NRC 11 January and 25 January; Va 16 January; RN 20 January, Kr 7 February, p 46; MK, no. 4, item 29 (with reproduction)
Comments -
No. 10
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 11, 28
Faille 1928/1970 1 / 1
Op de Coul 1
Sources AH 5 January; NRC 11 January; OK, I, p. 115; MK, no. 4, item 27 (with reproduction)
Comments In AH as no. 28
No. 12[a]
Faille 1928/1970 - / 62 Op de Coul 62
Sources NRC 25 January
Comments In NRC as no 12
No. 12[b]
Faille 1928/1970 - / 943
Op de Coul 943
Sources AH 5 January, Kr 7 February, p 46; OK, I, pp. 115-16
Comments In AH as no 12
No. 13
Faille 1928/1970 - / 19
Op de Coul 96
Sources OK, I, p. 115
Comments Identification according to Van Tilborgh and Vellekoop, op. cit. (note 10), p 52, note 11. Incorrect identification in De la Faille 1970
No. 14
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 15
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 16
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 17, 18, 34
Faille 1928/1970 4 / 2
Op de Coul 4
Sources AH 5 January; NRC 11 January and 25 January; Kr 17 January, p. 19 and 7 February, p. 46; RN 20 January; OK, I, p. 116; MK, no. 4, item 31 (with reproduction)
Comments In AH as no. 34; in OK as no. 18
No. 18, 17
Faille 1928/1970 - / 4
Op de Coul 2
Sources NRC 11 January; RN 20 January; OK, I, p. 116; MK, no. 4, item 30 (with reproduction)
Comments In OK as no 17
No. 19
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources NRC 25 January
Comments Painting entitled Head ‘eyes protruding from the face like nails’
No. 20
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 21
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 22
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 23
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 24, 35
Faille 1928/1970 37 / 37
Op de Coul 37
Sources AH 5 January, Kr 17 January, p. 20 and 7 February, p. 46, RN 20 January; NRC 25 January; MK, no. 4, item 32 (with reproduction)
Comments In AH as no. 35
No. 25
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 26
Faille 1928/1970 184 / 184
Op de Coul 184
Sources NRC 11 January, RN 20 January; OK, I, p 115; MK, no 4, item 28 (with reproduction)
Comments -
No. 27
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 28, 11
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1
Sources
AH 5 January
Comments See no. 11
No. 29
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources AH 5 January
Comments Painting: ‘head of a woman’
No. 30
Faille 1928/1970 98 / 98
Op de Coul 98
Sources OK, I, p. 115; MK, no. 4, item 25 (with reproduction) Comments -
No. 31
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1087
Op de Coul 1087
Sources RN 20 January
Comments -
No. 32
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 33
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources AH 5 January
Comments Painting entitled Head of a woman: ‘delicious green of the cap’
No. 34, 17, 18
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 4
Sources AH 5 January
Comments See nos. 17 and 18
No. 35, 24
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 37
Sources AH 5 January
Comments See no 24
No. 36
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 37, 2
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 48a
Sources AH 5 January
Comments See no. 2
No. 38, 3
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
[p. 114]
Op de Coul 39
Sources AH 5 January
Comments See no. 3
No. 39
Faille 1928/1970 -
Op de Coul -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 40
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1002
Op de Coul 1002
Sources RN 20 January; OK, I, p. 115; MK, no. 8, item 59 (with reproduction)
Comments -
No. 41
Faille 1928/1970 - / 5
Op de Coul 5
Sources AH 5 January; OK, I, p. 115
Comments -
No. 42
Faille 1928/1970 - / 6
Op de Coul 6
Sources AH 5 January; OK, I, p. 115
Comments -
No. 43
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources RN 20 January
Comments Painting entitled Weaver; ‘unfortunate little man bent crooked by work’
No. 44
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Sources NRC 11 January
Comments Painting entitled Head of a woman: ‘those staring eyes, the entire tragic-coarse composition of that head’
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 64
Sources NRC 11 January
Comments Painting: ‘ink bottle, a darning shell, and more of the like’
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 93
Sources Kr 17 January, p. 20
Comments Painting: ‘Evening, a farmyard at sunset’
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 110 (?)
Sources NRC 11 and 25 January
Comments Painting: ‘Bird's nests against a dark background’ (NRC 11 January)
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 146 / 146
Op de Coul?
Sources -
Comments In De la Faille 1928 an incorrect reference to MK, no. 4, item 30
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / 188
Op de Coul?
Sources -
Comments The attribution in De la Faille 1970, based on OK, I, p. 115, is incorrect
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / 190
Op de Coul 190
Sources OK, I, p. 115
Comments -
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / - Op de Coul 200
Sources Kr 17 January, p. 20
Comments Painting: ‘flowers and leaves in a jug’
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 852
Sources MK, no. 12, item 94 (with reproduction)
Comments De la Faille 1928 and 1970 mention no month of exhibition. The month (January) is found in the table of contents in MK 1903, not in no. 12
No. -
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1299 (?)
Sources NRC 11 January
Comments Drawing: ‘two people digging’

 

As yet unidentified works

 

Sources Kr 17 January, p. 20
Comments Painting:
‘Brabant woman’
Sources RN 20 January
Comments Drawing/watercolour (probably): ‘Views of the Schenkweg’ and ‘Houses near the Schenkweg’
Sources Kr 7 February
Comments Painting: ‘Shoes’
Sources OK, I, pp. 114-16
Comments Painting:
‘Westland peasant cottage’
Painting: ‘Brabant women’
Painting: ‘Weavers at their loom’
Painting: ‘Peasant woman’

Reconstruction of the exhibition held in May 190352

Faille 1970 -
Op de Coul 8a
Sources53 NRC 31 May
Comments Painting: ‘a woodland view’
Faille 1970 40
Op de Coul 40
Sources NRC 31 May; OK, II, p. 60
Comments -
Faille 1970 55
Op de Coul 55
Sources OK, II, p. 60
Comments -
Faille 1970 -
Op de Coul 72 or 73
Sources NRC 31 May; OK, II, p. 60
Comments Painting: ‘a woman, in her house, sitting as if congealed against the light from outside’ (NRC); an ‘admirable interior in terms of technique’ (OK)
Faille 1970 -
Op de Coul pb 187
Sources NRC 31 May
Comments Painting: ‘an agricultural labourer's house in green’
Faille 1970 -
Op de Coul pb 196
Sources NRC 31 May
Comments Painting: ‘an avenue with [a] gale in the trees’
Faille 1970 204
Op de Coul 204
Sources NRC 31 May; OK, II, p. 60
Comments -

As yet unidentified works

 

Sources NRC 31 May
Comments A couple of painted sketches: ‘Salpétrière head of a woman’
Sources OK, II, p. 60
Comments Paintings: ‘a couple of masterly done peasant women, heads grandiose in [their] ugliness’

Reconstruction of the exhibition held from 1 November to 13 December 1903

Paintings

 

No. 1
Title Peasant woman (interior at eventide)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert blue-green interior Sources54 -
Comments -
No. 2
Title Peasant woman from Nuenen
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments ‘The vivacity in 2’
No. 3
Title Peasant woman (half-length)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 127 or 144a
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Based on provenance F 127 (JH 651) and F 144a (JH 704) are the most likely candidates. See also no. 11
No. 4
Title Willow tree
Faille 1928/1970 195/10 and 195
Op de Coul 195
Plasschaert French, sky sultry, heavy in painting
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments Own observation: on the back is an
[p. 115]
Oldenzeel label and a reference to the November exhibition De la Faille 1970 incorrectly lists this work as F 10 and does not mention a catalogue number for F 195
No. 5
Title Peasant digging
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 166
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification based on subject and provenance
No. 6
Title Peasant dwelling (interior)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 78 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 7
Title Still life
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 54
Plasschaert -
Sources Wk 14 November, p. 514 (ill.); DZ-H 15 November (ill.)
Comments no. 34 is also possible
No. 8
Title Young peasant
Faille 1928/1970 -/-
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 9
Title Still life
Faille 1928/1970 - / 63
Op de Coul 63
Plasschaert clogs, small bottle, small brown pot, canvas on canvas
Sources Kr 14 November, p. 363; RN 16 November; NRC 22 November; OK, II, p. 174
Comments -
No. 10
Title Rocky landscape
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 2a
Plasschaert?
Sources - Comments Perhaps misleading description in the Oldenzeel list
No. 11
Title Peasant woman (half-length)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 127 or 144a
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments See comments on no. 3
No. 12
Title Weaver
Faille 1928/1970 - / 29 or 162
Op de Coul 29
Plasschaert canvas, white walls, red carpet
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356; OK, II, p 174
Comments Based on the colour description F 29 (JH 471) is the only possible candidate
No. 13
Title Head of a woman (white neckerchief)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 14
Title Small head of a woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / 133 and 153a
Op de Coul 133
Plasschaert light green-blue ground
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments Based on the NRC description F 133 (JH 584) is the most likely candidate. F 153a (JH 586) is probably no. 24
No. 15
Title Women on the land
Faille 1928/1970 - / 97
Op de Coul 97
Plasschaert potatoes
Sources Wk 14 November, p 514 and 21 November, p. 533 (ill.); DZ-H 15 November and 22 November (ill.); NRC 22 November
Comments Own observation in the photo archives of the Kröller-Müller Museum; on the back is an Oldenzeel label and a small label marked
no. 15 (fig. 6)
No. 16
Title Peasant woman from Nuenen
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments ‘There is something fanatical in the eyes of the woman in no. 16’
No. 17
Title Peasant dwelling
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Together with nos. 39 and 58 this is one of the works that definitely belonged to W. van Bakel55
No. 18
Title Landscape with peasant dwelling
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 187
Plasschaert -
Sources AH 7 November; RN 16 November; NRC 22 November; Kr 19 December, p. 404
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments ‘Landscape with peasant dwelling in twilight of gold and brown. Evening-darkened cloud above roof ridge and chimney’ (Kr)
No. 19
Title Small head of a woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 20
Title Peasant at work
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 21
Title Head of a woman, white cap
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert light-green dress, what a woman
Sources -
Comments -


illustratie
fig. 6
Labels on the back of F 97 JH 876, Otterlo, Kröller-Müller Museum


No. 22
Title Head of a woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 134
Plasschaert red cap, green ground
Sources -
Comments Identification based on colour reproduction in Paolo Lecaldano, L'opera pittorica completa di Van Gogh, 2 vols., 2d ed., Milan 1977, vol. 1, plate IX
No. 23
Title Still life (jars and melons)
Faille 1928/1970 - / 59
Op de Coul 59
Plasschaert ornamental pears
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356; Wk 14 November, p. 514 and 21 November, p. 533 (ill.); DZ-H 15 November and 22 November (ill.); RN 16 November; NRC 22 November; OK, II, p. 174
Comments -
No. 24
Title Peasant woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 153a
Plasschaert en profil [in profile] to the left
Sources -
Comments On back note relating to Oldenzeel December exhibition, Rotterdam (according to auction cat. Stuttgart [Kunstkabinett], 3 May 1962, lot 128)
No. 25
Title Girl in the woods
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 8a
Plasschaert document: study
Sources -
Comments Identification based on description by Plasschaert
[p. 116]
No. 26
Title Landscape (light effect)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 190 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources - Comments -
No. 27
Title Still life (tobacco pouches and bottle)
Faille 1928/1970 - / 55
Op de Coul 55
Plasschaert -
Sources Wk 14 November, p. 514; DZ-H 15 November; RN 16 November
Comments -
No. 28
Title Head of a woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert en face [front view], bluish-green dress, wearing cap
Sources -
Comments
No. 29
Title Brabant landscape
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 30
Title Winter
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul SP 1666
Plasschaert 3 men on ice, left mill; sky yellow and then grey recalls that little church with those people on the road
Sources Wk 21 November, p. 533 (ill.); DZ-H 22 November (ill.)
Comments -
No. 31
Title Peasant woman, peeling potatoes
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 73 or 145
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification based on subject and provenance. See also no. 51
No. 32
Title Peasant woman digging
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert planteuse de betteraves (woman planting beets)
Sources -
Comments -
No. 33
Title Landscape, gale in the trees
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 196
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments F 121 (JH 956) is mentioned as a candidate in Van Tilborgh and Vellekoop, op. cit. (note 41), p. 37. In my opinion this is incorrect (see No. 61)
No. 34
Title Still life
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 54
Plasschaert -
Sources Wk 14 November, p. 514 (ill.); DZ-H 15 November (ill.)
Comments Another possibility is no. 7
No. 35
Title Peasant dwelling
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul? Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 36
Title Woman at toil
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 147
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Own observation in Van Gogh Museum; Oldenzeel label on the back marked no. 36
No. 37
Title Woodland view
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 192 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 38
Title Bird's nests
Faille 1928/1970 - / 110
Op de Coul 110
Plasschaert 3 nests, lowest with blue eggs emerging from the darkness
Sources Kr 14 November, p. 363; RN 16 November; NRC 22 November; OK, II, p. 174
Comments -
No. 39
Title Peasant woman from Nuenen
Faille 1928/1970 - / SP 1667
Op de Coul SP 1667
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments See comments on no. 17
No. 40
Title Peasant woman with broom
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 152 Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification based on subject
No. 41
Title Farm in Brabant
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 42
Title Still life
Faille 1928/1970 - / 52
Op de Coul 52
Plasschaert Jar, little vase with cochlear, coffee mill, pipe
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356; Wk 14 November, p. 514; DZ-H 15 November, NRC 22 November; OK, II, p. 174
Comments The white pot is an apothecary jar. Cochlear is cochlearia officinalis or scurvy grass, used to treat scurvy
No. 43
Title Watermill
Faille 1928/1970 - / 46
Op de Coul 46
Plasschaert just the wheel
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356; NRC 22 November
Comments -
No. 44
Title Landscape (small watermill)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 48
Plasschaert wheel between two houses
Sources -
Comments F 48 (JH 527) and F 48a (JH 488) are possible but the former is small in size
No. 45
Title The shepherd
Faille 1928/1970 - / 42
Op de Coul 42
Plasschaert the desolate earth
Sources Wk 14 November, p. 514 (ill.); DZ-H 15 November (ill.); NRC 22 November
Comments -
No. 46
Title Weaver (small)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 35
Plasschaert -
Sources Wk 7 November, p. 498 (ill.) and 14 November, p. 514; DZ-H 8 November (ill.) and 15 November
Comments -
No. 47
Title Landscape with trees
Faille 1928/1970 - / 31
Op de Coul 31
Plasschaert -
Sources Wk 7 November, p. 498 (ill.); DZ-H 8 November (ill.); RN 16 November
Comments -
No. 48
Title Watermill (large)
Faille 1928/1970 - / 125
Op de Coul 125
Plasschaert watermill, long house, water in front, right greyish sky, woman left two men in boats
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356; Wk 7 November, p. 498 (ill.); DZ-H 8 November (ill.); RN 16 November; NRC 22 November; OK, II, pp. 174-5
Comments -
No. 49
Title Head of a woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 50
Title Woman by the fire
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 158
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Own observation in Musée d'Orsay, Paris: Oldenzeel label on back marked no. 50
No. 51
Title Peasant woman, peeling potatoes
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 73 or 145
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments See comments on no. 31
No. 52
Title Peasants on the land
Faille 1928/1970 - / 41 or 9
Op de Coul 41
Plasschaert the peasants as heavy earth phantoms for an immense grandeur. Sky
blue & cloud
Sources AH 7 November; Kr 14 November, p. 363; NRC 22 November; OK, II, p. 174
Comments De la Faille 1970 refers to F 41 (JH 513) or F 9 (JH 385) in connection with this number; reviews, however, discuss F 41 (JH 513)
No. 53
Title Landscape
[p. 117]
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 120 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources AH 7 November
Comments ‘That country road with the tragically high trees against the sky in motion’
No. 54
Title Head of a woman, widow
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 155
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Shawl indicates mourning
No. 55
Title Ditch with bridge, at evening
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 189
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification based on subject
No. 56
Title Weaver
Faille 1928/1970 - / 30
Op de Coul 30
Plasschaert the frame of a handloom, gold/mat (?) ground, how the little lamp hangs
Sources Kr 14 November, p 363; NRC 15 November, OK, II, p. 174
Comments -
No. 57
Title Weaver
Faille 1928/1970 - / 35
Op de Coul 37
Plasschaert with house and tree through windowpanes
Sources Kr 14 November, p 363; NRC 15 November
Comments Plasschaert's note was the deciding factor: F 37 (JH 501), not F 35 (JH 478), was the work exhibited
No. 58
Title Young peasant woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / SP 1668
Op de Coul SP 1668
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments Own observation Oldenzeel label on back marked no. 58.
See comments on no. 17
No. 59
Title Weaver (half-length)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 26
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification based on addition to title of ‘half-length’
No. 60
Title Brabant cottage
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 61
Title Landscape
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 121
Plasschaert -
Sources RN 16 November
Comments ‘Landscape with sunken road towards the gold-streaked sky’
No. 62
Title Peasant dwelling
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 91
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments ‘The clarity and whiteness in that beautiful Brabant day-labourer's house’
No. 63
Title Peasant woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources RN 16 November; NRC 22 November
Comments ‘The happily working peasant woman at the piece of linen that she stretches tightly over her knees’ (RN); ‘The colour in 63’ (NRC)
No. 64
Title Head of a woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -

 

Drawings and watercolours

 

No. 65
Title Woman by the fire
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1211
Op de Coul 1211
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 66
Title Market
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1091
Op de Coul 1091
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 67
Title Landscape
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 68
Title Three men
Faille 1928/1970 - / 948
Op de Coul 948
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 69
Title Woman praying
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1179
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments F 1053 (JH 357) and F 1179 (JH 324) are possible candidates. Provenance makes the latter more likely
No. 70
Title Residents of Scheveningen on a bench
Faille 1928/1970 - / 951
Op de Coul 951
Plasschaert reminiscent of 't Bezuidenhout
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356
Comments -
No. 71
Title View from Vincent's home
Faille 1928/1970 - / 943
Op de Coul 943
Plasschaert long roof
Sources Wk 21 November, p. 533; DZ-H 22
November
Comments -
No. 72
Title In the church
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 967
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments Watercolour:


illustratie
fig. 7
Cover of the Dagblad van Zuid-Holland en 's Gravenhage, 15/16 November 1903, The Hague, RKD


‘Woman with white cap in 72. One thinks with something like this of many a tame Dutch church scene!’
No. 73
Title Landscape, fields
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 904
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments ‘Watercolour no 73, Fields under rainy sky’
No. 74
Title Landscape, sawn off trees
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1095
Op de Coul 1095
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 75
Title Peasant woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments Drawing.
‘Peasant woman seated’
No. 76
Title Landscape, meadow
Faille 1928/1970 - / 916
Op de Coul 916
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 77
Title Horse
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1032
Op de Coul 1032
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 78
Title Landscape
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1104
Op de Coul 1104
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
[p. 118]
No. 79
Title Bible reader (fig. 7)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul SD 1683
Plasschaert -
Sources DZ-H 15
November (ill.); Wk 21 November, p. 533
Comments -
No. 80
Title Landscape with trees
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1088 or Landscape, without Faille no.56
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments Watercolour according to NRC
No. 81
Title Marshy landscape
Faille 1928/1970 - / 846
Op de Coul 846
Plasschaert the violence of the sky made motionless
Sources Kr 7 November, p. 356; NRC 8 November; RN 16 November
Comments -
No. 82
Title Woman spinning
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 83
Title Winter beach
Faille 1928/1970 - / 982
Op de Coul 982
Plasschaert Mauve-like
Sources Kr 14 November, p. 363
Comments -
No. 84
Title Orchard Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 902a
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification based on subject
No. 85
Title Portrait of Vincent's uncle or father
Faille 1928/1970 - / 876
Op de Coul 876
Plasschaert portrait of family member en profil [in profile]
Sources NRC 8 November; Wk 21 November, p. 533; DZ-H 22 November
Comments Identified as portrait of Vincent's grandfather (1789-1874). See Sjraar van Heugten, Van Gogh Bulletin (1994), no. 2, pp. 12-13
No. 86
Title Portrait of an old woman
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert like the one owned by Bremmer
Sources -
Comments -
No. 87
Title Peasant boy and hands
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1330 verso or drawing without Faille no.
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments The drawing (without Faille no.) is reproduced in Sotheby's (London), 27 June 1984, lot 303
No. 88
Title Landscape at eventide
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 1099
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Identification after Sjraar van Heugten, Vincent van Gogh: drawings. Vol. I: the early years, 1880-1883, Amsterdam & Bussum 1996, p. 240
No. 89
Title Country road
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul?
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 90
Title Weaver with child
Faille 1928/1970 - / 1119
Op de Coul 1119
Plasschaert -
Sources Wk 14 November, p. 514 and 21 November, p. 533; DZ-H 15 November and 22 November
Comments nos. 90 and 92 are watercolours. Candidates are F 1119 (JH 449) and SD 1688 (JH 482)
No. 91
Title Peat moor with bog
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1101 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 92
Title Weaver, standing
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul SD 1688
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments See no. 90
No. 93
Title Little courtyard (sketch)
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 944
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments Drawing: ‘Through the white patches and dripping gold, through the figure contours, The little Courtyard (93) recalls Rochussen’
No. 94
Title At the doctor
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul pb 909
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments Watercolour: ‘This gold veil also lies over At the Doctor (94)’
No. 95
Title Girl in the woods
Faille 1928/1970 - / 949
Op de Coul 949
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments -
No. 96
Title Church with sheep
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 877
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments Own observation: on the back label marked no. 96
No. 97
Title Marsh with wheelbarrow
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1100
Plasschaert -
Sources - Comments Identification based on subject
No. 98
Title Cottage with wheelbarrow
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1106 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -
No. 99
Title Autumn
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1234 (?)
Plasschaert -
Sources NRC 22 November
Comments Watercolour: ‘The Avenue no. 99 recalls piece that Boymans has’
No. 100
Title Donkey cart
Faille 1928/1970 - / -
Op de Coul 1079 recto
Plasschaert -
Sources -
Comments -

 

As yet unidentified works

 

Sources OK, II, pp. 173-75
Comments Paintings: portraits
Sources NRC 8 November
Comments Drawing or watercolour: loom (probably no. 90 or no. 92)
Sources Kr 14 November
Comments Paintings: portraits of women; face of an old woman (perhaps no. 86)
Sources NRC 15 November
Comments Painting: still life
Sources RN 16 November
Comments Paintings: portraits
Sources Kr 19 December
Comments Painting: weaver at loom
Sources Wk 14 and 21 November; DZ-H 15 and 22 November
Comments Drawings: heads of women; Japanese pen drawing; painting: loom
[p. 119]

Concordance

Jan/ Feb May Nov/ Dec Auction Mouwen May Nov/ Dec
F 1903 1903 1903 1904* 1904*
  Paintings  
1  
2  
2a    
4  
5  
6  
8a    
14  
15  
15a  
16  
18    
20    
21  
24  
26    
27  
29    
30    
31    
33  
35    
37    
39  
40    
41    
42    
43    
46    
48    
48a    
52    
54    
55    
58  
59    
60  
62  
63    
64  
67  
72   • (or 73)  
73   • (or 72)
78   • (?)  
90    
91   • (pb)  
93  
96  
97    
98  
104  
110  
114  
119  
120   • (?) • (or 123)  
121    
122  
123   • (or 120)  
125  
127    
128  
133    
134    
136a  
142    
144  
144a  
145    
147    
152    
153a    
155    
158    
166    
177  
177a  
184  
186  
187    
189   • (pb)
190    
192    
194  
195    
196  
197  
198  
199  
200  
204    
210  
SP 1666    
SP 1667    
SP 1668    
  Drawings/Watercolours  
842   • (?)  
846    
852    
876    
877    
886  
902a    
904   • (pb)  
909   • (pb)  
913   • (?)
916    
926  
943  
944   • (pb)  
948    
949    
951  
967    
982    
990  
1001  
1002    
1031  
1032    
1038  
1079 recto    
1087    
1088   • (?)  
1091    
1095    
1099   • (pb)  
1100    
1101   • (?) • (?)  
1103    
1104    
1106   • (?)  
1119  
1179    
1211    
1234   • (?)  
1296  
1299 • (?)  
1330 verso   • (?)  
SD 1683    
SD 1688    
Drawing without F no.  
Watercolour without F no.  
 
* = Information derived from Faille 1970  
pb = probably  
? = perhaps